Resources

Vance Hashimoto: Crossing the Ka’iwi Channel

Vance Hashimoto: Crossing the Ka’iwi Channel

Naim: Some people think paddling across the Kaiwi channel sans rudder is crazy. What inspired you to take on the molo solo on V1? Vance: Luke and Makana raced rudderless the 2010 M2M (Maui to Molokai), and did well. That inspired me to race V1 in M2M last year , and after doing that race I thought I could handle 6 more miles for the Solo. I was trying to do all the winter series races rudderless this year, so the Solo seemed like the next step. Also, the tide was good for this years crossing. So no matter what the wind, I'd at least have the current on my side! Naim: What was the tide...

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Voyage to Neah Bay: Part 2

Voyage to Neah Bay: Part 2

It happened! A connection in the water from Seattle to Neah Bay has been made. The journey gave us more then we could have ever expected. This was the first time an OC6 - six person Hawaiian Outrigger Canoe has followed this route. We greatly respect the native cultures and tried our best to follow protocols along the way. We divided the voyage into three 50 mile parts we called journeys. In each journey we would have 7-8 legs of about 5-10 miles each (maps linked below) where we would alternate crews. The first journey was from Lake Washington to Port Townsend on June 15th, Journey 2 from Port...

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Voyage to Neah Bay: Part 1

Voyage to Neah Bay: Part 1

Lake Washington to Port Townsend - Recap In 2011, Kimokeo Kapahulehua of the Hawaiian Outrigger Voyaging Society visited Seattle and gave a talk at St Marks cathedral at a community event called a Water Circle, where we discussed how to be stewards of the ocean. At this meeting Kimokeo inspired us to begin voyaging, starting in the Puget Sound, then expanding along the coast of Washington to Oregon or to Canada and Alaska, and eventually when ready, from Seattle to Hawaii. Around that same time, Jono Saunders and his father, John Guzzwell, began building a wooden outrigger canoe from their...

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Fai3 V1 – Available

Fai3 V1 – Available

(Update: This canoe is no longer available.) If you are in the Pacific Northwest and have been considering Rudderless V1, now could be the right time for you. Tahiti made Fai3 is now available. This canoe is very rare and very difficult to get access to unless you are in Tahiti, where it is the most popular V1 and used by the best paddlers (first place finishes in Te Aito and Super Aito). In 2011 a big effort was made to bring a container of canoes from Tahiti to Hawaii and Mainland US, the purpose was for us to learn from the Tahitian by paddling the canoe they paddle. FAI 3 follows the successful...

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RW – Technique Day 3

Renick, you're there bro! I can see you correcting yourself and focusing on the different phases of the stroke, this is basically what you need to be doing to improve. There are a few things I noticed, at this point I dont have a specific action for you to take other then for you to be aware of what is happening. Right side: arms are just about perfect amount of bend, your body is rotating through the drive. But you are not reaching as much and are catching a few inches of air before plant. Left side: bottom arm bends on drive, you are over compensating (your right must be your dominant...

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MP – Technique Day 3

In the first session we discussed 2 problem areas, 1) the recovery being real flared out and wide, 2) the frame of the stroke was small and hindered. We worked on opening the stroke by raising the top arm, then getting more reach. Next we session we continued trying to improve top hand by reducing movement then focused on 1: Rotate more, lunge less and 2) Keep paddle closer to the board on the exit and recover. The "D" shape in the water, make it smaller. You are basically there. Your top hand has way less movement, you can see the grouping is about have the size as it was when we started....

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Art – Technique Training

There are 5 basic phases of the stroke Setup Catch Drive Exit Recovery There may be multiple phases, but there is no separation between each phase. Each phase transitions smoothly into the next. There should be no stops, stalls or pauses. That does not mean that every phase moves at the same pace, just that there is no separation. The Setup is perhaps the most important phase of the stroke. If you do not position yourself to make a good Setup, you can not make a good Catch. If you do not make a good Catch, there is nothing you can do downstream in the stroke to make up for it; it’s...

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Renick – Technique Day 2

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 You technique is looking a lot better! Some issues that now stand out are: Elbow dropping, kicking into the stroke Smoothness of entire stroke from setup to exit Slow down the recovery I'm not sure exactly what is causing this, but if you watch your technique you will see an occasional drop of the elbow as your push through the drive. Try and identify what is causing this. Remember you want connectiveness from your top arm wrist to your bottom arm wrist. Imagine holding a giant 85cm exercise ball inside of your arms. Paddling is more endurance then...

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Protected: Greg – Technique Day 1

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Boe – Technique Day 1

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 There are 5 basic phases of the stroke Setup Catch Drive Exit Recovery There may be multiple phases, but there is no separation between each phase. Each phase transitions smoothly into the next. There should be no stops, stalls or pauses. That does not mean that every phase moves at the same pace, just that there is no separation. The Setup is perhaps the most important phase of the stroke. If you do not position yourself to make a good Setup, you can not make a good Catch. If you do not make a good Catch, there is nothing you can do downstream in the stroke...

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